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Wednesday, January 29, 2014

That Personal Touch

What's It Wednesday #109
One thing that I look for in any piece is history. I want it to tell a story of the people whose lives it touched. That's why I love pieces that have initials or names engraved on them.

It gives the piece, “that personal touch”, and says that it was cherished, and important to someone. Even if it was not of great value monetarily.

Silver, even silver plate was a big deal in the 1800's and early 1900's, too. So many gifts, like these calling card cases and dance card would have the ladies initials proudly displayed.

One of my favorite collectibles is silver for my dressing set. This powder jar and nail file are engraved as well.

Letter writing was a part of a lady's pastime and responsibility in Victorian times.

After a carefully placed drop of wax on the envelope, they used a seal much like this one, engraved with scrolled initials, to seal it.

Any little shiny bit, like these pill boxes or this delicate lady's watch would bare the engraver's mark.

Silverware, table linens and bedding all bore the mark of their once proud owners. Sometimes when I’m out antiquing a dealer will proudly show me a piece without engraving as a huge selling point.

I just smile, say “no thank you”, and walk away. I'll wait for the one's that have been pre-owned and pre-loved. Because that will only make them all the more valuable to me.
Hugs,
Patti

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Here are this Week's Features:






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Ivy and Elephants


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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Ode to Haiti

What's It Wednesday #108

My home features art from around the world which includes the Caribbean. My favorites are from Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Cuba. Haitian art has always been one of my favorite with its roots grounded in Africa, mixed with European aesthetics, and a tinge of religious flavor. 

Haitian sculptures are made from natural materials such such as this one carved from a large piece of bamboo, traditional mediums such as canvas, and recycle materials like a piece of tin or the top of an oil drum.


Haitian artists, who deal in wood, are masters at wood carvings. The precision is amazing and the local wood, such as mahogany, utilized are simply beautiful. 




This lady carrying her goods over head has been a part of our family for a very long time. We have always felt that she is the keeper of our home. She is not only beautiful, but absolutely magical.  

This little fella is older than me. He use to reside in my grand-mother's home. As a little girl, I often wondered what he was carrying in his sack. Was it flour or was it rice? 


Haitian mahogany is used to create wood vases that are not only beautiful but completely utilitarian. 

On January 12th, 2010, Haiti was struck by a catastrophic earthquake. Living in South Florida, we are reminded of the resilience of the people of Haiti and continue to support the possibilities and hope of this island nation. As our family reflected on the four year anniversary of the devastating earthquake, I write this post as an Ode to Haiti. 

L'Union Fait La Force 
(Unity is Strength - Haitian Motto)

xoxoxo
Paula

Thanks to all of you who partied with us last week. Please link-up and join us again. Remember, it's not a party without you!


Here are this Week's Features:

Annie's Home

Entertaining from an Ethnic Indian Kitchen

Every Evolving Life 4-5

Knick of Time Interiors

Creatively Sam's

With a Dash of Color

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Ivy and Elephants


We are partying with these fine folks:
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Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Pin Money

What's It Wednesday #107
What a difference the passage of time can make. I thought I'd share my little collection of “pin money” banks. These quaint little charmers are from the fifties, made popular by Lefton. Now, we think of pin money as pocket money or spare change, but the term has quite a history.

Catherine Howard, wife of Henry VIII, introduced the humble pin to England from France. They were an expensive commodity since each one was forged individually. (Imagine sewing with no pins!)

In order to purchase this luxury, a special allowance was given to the wife by her husband. Thus the term “pin money”.

Lefton capitalized on this phrase in the 50's by making these adorable pink banks adorned with flowers.

Since pins later became inexpensive, the term came to mean a small amount of money that you save up and spend on yourself for little extras that make you happy. Like a pin money bank!
Hugs,
Patti

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Jennelise Rose


We are partying with these fine folks:
Come show off your whatchamacallits, what is its, what it once was, and "hey, look what I just did" posts. In other words, what you created, organized, designed or re-designed, found, purchased, transformed, inherited, re-purposed, renovated, are selling, or giving-away.

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Gratitude is the Memory of the Heart ~ French Proverb ~ We are so grateful that you stopped by ~ Please visit again soon! ~ Much Love, Patricia and Paula